Object structure

Title:

Political And Social Subtext In Nahum Tate’s Shakespeare Adaptations

Creator:

Szwach, Agnieszka

Keywords:

adaptation ; classicism ; Restoration theatre ; Shakespeare ; Nahum Tate

Abstract:

This paper attempts to analyse two of Nahum Tate's Shakespeare adaptations namely: The Sicilian Usurper (1680), the adaptation of Richard II and The History of King Lear (1681). This is done with the aim to show that Tate's adaptations were in a twofold way shaped by the political and social matters. Firstly, as it was the requirement of the Restoration theatre, he had to subject his works to the rules of French classicism, a literary theory, which was devised to strengthen the royal power as the authority of the rules in the theatre was supposed to reflect the authority of the royal power. Secondly, Tate had to be cautious that his works were critically, socially and politically acceptable in the turbulent times of 1680s.Therefore, the characters of Shakespearean drama became over-simplified reflections of the original heroes. Numerous scenes, language puns or literary figures were just cut out. However, everything that was removed from the plays, everything that was “unsaid” on the Restoration stage provided a rich, open to interpretation subtext of political and social anxiety in England during the reign of Charles II.

Place of publishing:

Kielce

ISSN:

2450-0380

Publisher:

Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Jana Kochanowskiego w Kielcach

Date issued:

2019

Type:

tekst

Format:

application/pdf

Identifier:

doi:10.25951/4104

Language:

angielski

Is part of:

Studia Filologiczne Uniwersytetu Jana Kochanowskiego

Has part:

tom 32

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